"Search Your Heart and Deep Inside You Will Find... Art"

Dedicated to Barcelona's Most Important Works

Because the Night: Curating One-Off Nocturnal Events

Posted by on May 30, 2013 in General | Comments Off

Because the Night: Curating One-Off Nocturnal Events

 

Free art events are coming to you. Read more:

Text / Helena Reckitt

Since Paris established Nuit Blanche in 2002, the phenomenon of the one-off, late-night or all night free public art event has spread across the world, from cities including Madrid, Riga, and Reykjavik to Tel Aviv, Santa Monica, and Toronto. Animating landmark districts and extending into marginal neighborhoods, these festive events showcase contemporary art with an emphasis on luminous visual spectacle and audience participation.  Need a women drug rehab? Click here.

affordable rehab from drugs in GeorgiaMayor Bertrand Delanoë launched Nuit Blanche as part of a plan to reassert Paris’ post-World War II reputation for artistic innovation. Urban centers inspired by the Paris event shared its ambition to brand or rebrand their particular cities. Lisbon’s Luzboa festival, established in 2004, reimagines public space and rehabilitates unsafe or undesirable neighborhoods through light. Nuit Blanche in Toronto receives funding from the provincial cultural agency that was established to combat the negative impact of the SARS epidemic on tourism. The UK nationwide program Light Night aims to overcome some of the negative perceptions associated with the nighttime economy in many British city centers.1 Although a more grassroots effort, Atlanta’s Le Flash, from which the current Flux Night grew, has nonetheless played its part in urban rebranding. For a great drug rehab thats faith based, check out the link.  Launched in Castleberry Hill in 2008, when the neighborhood’s identity was shifting from an arts quarter to a late-night bar district, the event has helped to reassert the area’s cultural character. Whereas founders Cathy Byrd and Stuart Keeler established Le Flash on a bare-bones budget, Flux Night is now operated by the small but active arts organization Flux Projects. Funding comes from the collector and businessman Louis Corrigan and other private donors who wanted to demonstrate their faith in Atlanta’s art scene and artists in the wake of the recession.

 

Finish this article: http://artpapers.org/

 

Read More

German Art Shipper Finally Released from China

Posted by on May 30, 2013 in General | Comments Off

German Art Shipper Finally Released from China

When it comes to art, often the bottom line is dollars and cents and that sometimes means people calously breaking the law in order to make the most amount of money.  Last year one such circumstance led to an arresst that shocked many in the art world, but is not enrirely surprising.

The German art shipper who was jailed for 100 days by Chinese authorities on suspicion of art smuggling has left China, although the legal proceedings against him are still ongoing. Nils Jennrich, the Beijing-based general manager of Integrated Fine Art Solutions, was arrested along with Lydia Chu, the firm’s operations manager in March 2012 after a raid on the freight company and detained in a jail outside Beijing. He was released on bail in August last year but barred from leaving the country.

The arrests, which emerged during last year’s Art HK fair, shocked the art world and were part of a wider crackdown on tax evasion that deterred buyers of Chinese art in 2012.

Guido Westerwelle, Germany’s foreign minister, says in statement that he was “relieved” that Jennrich has been able to leave China, bringing to an end “many months of uncertainty and worry for his friends and family”.

Jennrich’s release comes days before Li Keqiang, the new Chinese premier, is due to visit Berlin. Nancy Murphy, a Beijing-based partner at law firm Jingcheng, Tongda & Neal, which represents Jennrich, tells The Art Newspaper that he had been allowed by the Chinese authorities to return to Germany on “humanitarian grounds” as his parents are sick and his fiancé is heavily pregnant. “It is really a diplomatic rather than legal solution,” Murphy says. “The German government has been raising this issue.”

Finish this article by visiting: http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/German-shipper-jailed-by-Chinese-returns-home/29623

The other important factor in this case is that it began with the tax evasion quiestions.  As tough as it may be at times to except, none of us can exist in a bubble and have to recognize that the powers that be are in some way instrumental to the success of a business wether it be through infrastructure or grant.  That means the cost of success is taxes. We will keep you updated on this case.

 

Read More

Go Short Film Festival News

Posted by on May 30, 2013 in General | Comments Off

Go Short Film Festival News

Film festivals are a great diversion and invite people to gain new perspectives on things. For the 5th time, the Go Short film festival took place in the Netherlands. It was a fun time for all and there were a few surprises.  Read more…

Go Short for 5th time in Nijmegen

 Nijmegen is all about Go Short. Walking through the city, it was impossible NOT to notice the festival feeling of Go Short, which is the Dutch festival for short film that this year took place for 5th time. For five days, over 300 short films were screened in and around LUX in Nijmegen. Backbone of the program were the films in EuropeanDutch and Student Competition.

Additionally, there were focus programs on the Milestones of Short Film, on Swedish Shorts, on Autour de Minuit and of course the Oscar Shorts. Besides screenings there were exhibitions, workshops, performances, parties and more! ‘Sweden’ was one of the most important themes of the festival. Swedish ambassador Håkan Emsgård talked with Ronnie Sandahl, director of The Route 43 Miracle, about the reflection of life in Swedish film.

read more at: http://www.balkansbeyondborders.eu/art-news-from-europe/go-short-for-5th-time-in-nijmegen/

There is a full listing of the stand outs from the festival which can be found on the link above. Please like us and share us if you found this information useful.

Read More

The art of Europe encompasses the history of visual art in Europe. European prehistoric art started as mobile rock, and cave painting art, and was characteristic of the period between the Paleolithic and the Iron Age.[1]

Written histories of European art often begin with the art of the Ancient Middle East, and the Ancient Aegean civilisations, dating from the 3rd millennium BC. Parallel with these significant cultures, art of one form or another existed all over Europe, wherever there were people, leaving signs such as carvings, decorated artifacts and huge standing stones. However a consistent pattern of artistic development within Europe becomes clear only with the art of Ancient Greece, adopted and transformed by Rome and carried; with the Empire, across much of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.[citation needed]

The influence of the art of the Classical period waxed and waned throughout the next two thousand years, seeming to slip into a distant memory in parts of the Medieval period, to re-emerge in the Renaissance, suffer a period of what some early art historians viewed as "decay" during the Baroque period,[2] to reappear in a refined form in Neo-Classicism and to be reborn in Post-Modernism.

Before 1800s, the Christian church was a major influence upon European art, the commissions of the Church, architectural, painterly and sculptural, providing the major source of work for artists. The history of the Church was very much reflected in the history of art, during this period. In the same period of time there was renewed interest in heroes and heroines, tales of mythological gods and goddesses, great wars, and bizarre creatures which were not connected to religion.[3]

Secularism has influenced European art since the Classical period, while most art of the last 200 years has been produced without reference to religion and often with no particular ideology at all. On the other hand, European art has often been influenced by politics of one kind or another, of the state, of the patron and of the artist.

European art is arranged into a number of stylistic periods, which, historically, overlap each other as different styles flourished in different areas. Broadly the periods are, Classical, Byzantine, Medieval, Gothic Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassical, Modern and Postmodern.[4]Read More at: European History of Art